Politics and the Human Soul

We human beings are strange animals…the one and only political animals. Why do human beings alone organize ourselves into political regimes and govern ourselves with laws? How should we order our political communities so as to encourage the flourishing of our distinctive nature? Explore questions such as these with the aid of great thinkers from Plato to Alexis de Tocqueville.

Meet the Faculty

Hear from Other Students

Fall Course

FYW 1300: Politics and the Good Life

FYW 1300 will consider the nature of human happiness and the proper order of our political communities. It will also introduce students to classical rhetoric, the art of persuasion and teaching which stands at the crossroads of our common and individual quests for the good. This class fulfills the first-year writing seminar graduation requirement.

Spring Course

POL 103: Introduction to Political Thought

POL 103 considers the comprehensive political questions:  justice, the best regime, and the good human life. With the help of some of the great texts of political philosophy, this course explores the enduring philosophical problems – the meaning of virtue and happiness, the origins of legitimate authority – toward which our everyday political disagreements point. This class fulfills the “Ultimate Questions” GER.

Faculty Mentors

Benjamin Storey

Dr. Storey serves as faculty for Politics and the Human Soul and teaches the FYW Happiness, Persuasion, and Politics seminar. A winner of the 2016 Alester G. and Janie Earle Furman, Jr. Award for Excellence in Teaching, he joined the Engaged Living program after a one-year Visiting Fellowship with the Department of Politics at Princeton University during the 2016-2017 academic year. He recently finished a book, co-authored with Jenna Storey: Why We Are Restless: What Four French Thinkers Can Teach Us About Contentment (Princeton University Press, 2021).

Jenna Silber Storey

Dr. Storey serves as faculty for Politics and the Human Soul and teaches the POL 103 Introduction to Political Thought class. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Politics and International Affairs, and the Managing Director of the Tocqueville Program at Furman (furman.edu/Tocqueville). She recently finished a book, co-authored with Ben Storey: Why We Are Restless: What Four French Thinkers Can Teach Us About Contentment (Princeton University Press, 2021). In 2018-2019, she won the Silas N. Pearman award for her teaching in the Engaged Living Program.