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Women's History Month

Women's contributions and accomplishments for the most part have been overlooked and consequently omitted from mainstream culture. Women have been pioneers and partners in the fields of science, medicine, government, law, education, social service, literature, philanthropy, the arts, sports, business, and in the nurture of family and community from before our nation was founded. Yet neither traditional female roles nor the women who pushed the boundaries of those roles have been systematically explored and acknowledged. The wonderful accomplishments of extraordinary women should be known by all. Test your knoweledge with this Women's History Quiz or take Another Women's History Quiz

Events at Furman March 2005:

CLP!

March 8th, Burgiss Theatre, 7:00 - 9:00. Film Iron Jawed Angels.Dr Smith from the Political Science department will introduce the film Iron Jawed Angels. This 2004 HBO movie is about the suffragette movement, a period of history that is far too often overlooked patriarchal history books. Those who think that the suffragettes had a parade and got the right to vote have not seen this movie. Hilary Swank stars as Alice Paul, a radical suffragette. She was head of the NWP (National Women's Party) who was sent to prison and beaten in order to achieve the right to vote for women. This movie will make Furman students realize that the process of gaining the franchise for women was a long, tortuous road that is important for contemporary students to learn and appreciate. Dr. Smith will give an introduction with a brief history of the politics of the fight for women's suffrage and the role of the NWP and Alice Paul in the fight and a discussion of what this meant for women politically and socially.

 

CLP!

March 14th, Johns Hall 101, 7:00 - 8:30 p.m. Furman Women of Different Generations. For this event we are having 3 female Furman graduates, Betsy Moseley class of '76, Danielle Vinson Class of '89, and Courtney Tollison Class of '99, and a current Furman student speak about what Furman and America were like for women when they were students. For the Feminist movement to keep moving forward, we must know where we have been. Dr. Jane Love will give an introduction explaining the cultural and political significance of women sharing their personal experiences. Since the consciousness-raising of groups of the 60s and 70s, the battle cry of the feminist movement has been "the personal is the political," meaning that personal troubles are also societal woes. Dr. Love will explain how feminists have always valued personal experience as vital data.

 

CLP!

March 21st, Townes Auditorium, 7:30-9:00 p.m. Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons: Women's Rights Debates in Islamic Discourse. She will speak at Furman about Civil Rights, Islam, and Women. Many Muslims have embraced the oppression of women as religiously required, much like African-Americans and Whites used Biblical explanations to justify the segregation of Whites and Blacks during the 1960s civil rights movement. Dr. Zoharah Simmons was a civil rights and peace activist and is a student of Sufi Islam, which emphasizes an egalitarian ethos. Distinctions of race, class, ideology, religion, and gender are not to be tolerated. Therefore she believes that any rationalization for the oppression of women in Islam, explanatory or apologetic, are discriminatory against women. Laws, which endorse honor killings, polygamy, unequal demands for chastity and modesty on women but not men, and restrictions on female education, job opportunities, and travel, cannot be justified. A radical new discussion about the oppression of women from a Muslim feminist perspective needs to happen. This event should carry CLP credit because many students are misinformed about Islamic cultures, from those who think that all Muslims are evil to cultural relativists who think mistreatment of women is just another justifiable aspect of the culture. Dr. Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons, with her experience in the Civil Rights Movement and her studies in Islam, she is the perfect person to explain that domination of women in Islam is neither justifiable nor proof that Islam is a corrupted religion. This should be an enlightening and educational event.

 

CLP !
March 23rd, Burgiss Theatre, 5:00-7:00 p.m., Film If These Walls Could Talk 2. The 2000 movie, If These Walls Could Talk 2, shows three separate stories spanning 40 years dealing with women and lesbianism. First story, 1961: When Abby dies of a stroke, her surviving partner of 50 years, Edith, must silently face heartbreak and the denial of her status as "family" by the hospital and Abby's heirs. Second story, 1972: Linda, a feminist, out, college student is ousted, along with her lesbian cohorts, from the on-campus womens group: the cause of feminism comes first, appa"rently. In an attempt to forget their troubles, the friends go to the only lesbian bar in town, where Linda meets Amy, who is too butch to pass muster with Linda's friends. Intrigued, despite her friends' disapproval, Linda comes to understand and fall in love with Amy while learning about her own prejudices. Third story, 2000: Fran and Kal want to have a baby. But they want the baby to be theirs and theirs alone, so to the sperm bank they go. But the decisions to be made! Ordering over the internet? Which donor? What race? What gender? And what if the sperm bank is out of that particular perfect donor? And above all, is it right to bring a baby into a world that will undoubtedly be prejudiced? Dr. Susan Munkres will give an introduction to the film. She will discuss the implications of the film with regards to the social acceptability of lesbians and the treatment of lesbians within the feminist movement. Dr. Munkres will explain the deeper social implications of these stories. These are not just individ"ual events happening to individual people, but rather examples of larger social implications about the discrimination and prejudice lesbians face everyday.

 

 

 

Women's History is everyone's history

http://www.galegroup.com/free_resources/whm/bio/index.htm

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