Thomas M. Lewis was born in Madison, Wisconsin, but spent his formative years in Milwaukee. He grew up on the city's northeast side in a neighborhood near the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Milwaukee had been a great industrial city, and some of its former swagger remained, but the city of Dr. Lewis' youth resembled a prizefighter past its prime and on the way down, a lovable old palooka with a big heart.

Dr. Lewis attended Saints Peter and Paul grade school and Messmer High School. He went to Marquette University in 1980. Marquette won the NCAA men's basketball tournament in 1977, but its days as a basketball powerhouse ended when Al McGuire retired that year. Dr. Lewis had many great teachers at Marquette, including Peter Jones, Tom Bronikowski, Michael Gillespie, and Harry Klocker, S.J. He left Marquette with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics. From there, he went 90 miles west to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for graduate school in mathematics. He intended to study algebra, but found himself drawn to analysis and probability. He had many wonderful teachers and mentors at the University of Wisconsin, including Jim Kuelbs, Tom Kurtz, and Peter Ney. His dissertation, A Law of the Iterated Logarithm for Random Walk in Random Scenery, was written under the direction of Kuelbs.

Dr. Lewis left the University of Wisconsin in 1991 for Greenville, South Carolina and Furman University. Over the years, he has had the pleasure of working in the company of many dedicated colleagues and students. While he continues to work primarily in probability theory, his research interests have broadened over the years, largely due to working with students on research projects. His research interests are: random walk in random scenery; iterated Brownian motion; the Gaussian correlation inequality; fractal geometry; random graphs; and combinatorics. Dr. Lewis has had the opportunity to work with and learn from some of best mathematicians of his generation: Wenbo Li, Davar Khonevisan, Joel Zinn, Geoffrey Pritchard, and Zhan Shi.

Name Title Description

FYW-1180

C.S. Lewis

Exploration of the life, work and theology of C.S. Lewis (1898-1963), one of the most influential Christian writers of the 20th century. Topics to be explored include Lewis's writing on Christian belief, morality, forgiveness, faith, pain and the nature of heaven and hell -- all with an emphasis on practical applications to modern life.

MTH-110

Finite Mathematics

Topics include: set theory, combinatorics, probability, statistics, matrix algebra, linear programming, Markov chains, graph theory, and mathematics of finance. A student cannot receive credit for this course after credit has been received for MTH-260 or any mathematics course numbered greater than MTH-302.

MTH-120

Introduction to Statistics

Non-calculus based course in elementary probability and statistics. Counting problems, probability, various distributions, random variables, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. A student cannot receive credit for this course and ECN-225 or MTH-341.

MTH-140

Integrated Precalc/Calc I

Introduction to the theory and methods of differential calculus. Topics include functions, graphs, limits, continuity and derivatives. May not be enrolled on a pass-fail basis.

MTH-141

Integrated Precalc/Calc II

Introduction to applications of the derivative and the theory and applications of the definite integral. Topics include: trigonometric functions and their derivatives, applications of derivatives, antiderivatives, the definite integral and applications of the integral.

MTH-145

Calc for Life & Social Science

Introduction to the methods of differential and integral calculus with an emphasis on applications in the management, life, and social sciences. Topics include limits and continuity, differentiation and integration of functions of one variable, exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications.

MTH-150

Analytic Geometry/Calculus I

First course in the standard calculus sequence. Introduction to the theory, methods, and applications of differential calculus and an introduction to the definite integral. Topics include: algebraic and trigonometric functions, limits and continuity, rules for differentiation, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, and the definition and basic properties of the definite integral.

MTH-151

Analytic Geometry/Calculus II

The second course in the standard calculus sequence. An introduction to the logarithmic and exponential functions, the applications of the definite integral, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, numerical methods, and infinite series.

MTH-160

Vectors and Matrices

Introduction to the theory of vectors and matrices. Among the topics included are: vectors, vector operations, the geometry of Euclidean space, systems of equations, matrices, matrix operations, special transformations, eigenvalues, and applications of matrix theory.

MTH-241

Introduction to Statistics

Non-calculus based course in elementary probability and statistics. Counting problems, probability, various distributions, random variables, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. A student cannot receive credit for this course and ECN-225 (25) or MTH-341 (47).

MTH-260

Higher Mathematics Transition

Introduction to the main ideas and proof techniques of mathematics with an emphasis on reading, writing and understanding mathematical reasoning. Among the topics covered are logic, proof techniques, sets, cardinality, combinatorial enumeration, mathematical induction, relations, functions, and others selected by the instructor.

MTH-340

Probability

Calculus-based course in probability, covering counting, discrete and continuous probability, random variables, important probability distributions, joint distributions, expectation, moment generating functions, and applications of probability.

MTH-350

Complex Variables

Study of the complex plane and the calculus of functions of a complex variable. Topics to be considered include the algebra and geometry of complex numbers, limits and derivatives of functions of a complex variable, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, contour integrals, Taylor and Laurent series, and residues.

MTH-420

Topology

Introduction to concepts in topology including the following: topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, homeomorphisms, neighborhoods, closed sets and closure, basis and sub-basis for a topology, subspaces, product spaces, connectivity, compactness, and separation axioms.

MTH-450

Real Analysis

A theoretical introduction to some of the basic ideas of real analysis: real numbers and the topology of the real line, sequences and series of real numbers, limits of functions, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, the Riemann integral, and sequences and series of functions.

MTH-451

Topics in Analysis

An in-depth investigation of selected topics in analysis.

Thomas M. Lewis' research interests are: random walk in random scenery; iterated Brownian motion; the Gaussian correlation inequality; fractal geometry; random graphs; and combinatorics.

Education
Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin - Madison
B.S.
Marquette University

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