"Matt Feigenbaum Furman University"

After graduating from Furman in 1988 and earning a Master’s degree from his alma mater in 1990, Dr. Feigenbaum began his teaching and coaching career at Mainland High School in Daytona Beach.  In 1993, he went on to pursue a Ph.D. in physiology at the University of Florida where his research focused on physiological responses and adaptations to chronic heart failure.  In 1996, Dr. Feigenbaum returned to Furman and joined the faculty in the Department of Health Sciences and was also appointed a Clinical Associate and conducted research at the Greenville Hospital System’s HeartLife Program.  While at Furman, he has taught a variety of courses which currently focus on human anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and the science of aging.  He has received research grants from The Duke Endowment, The Piedmont HealthCare Foundation, and the YMCA of Greenville and has published in professional journals to include The American Journal of Cardiology, Circulation, Pediatrics, and Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise.  Dr. Feigenbaum has written half-a-dozen textbook chapters to include contributions to Pollock’s Textbook of Cardiovascular Disease and Rehabilitation, Resistance Training for Health, Disease Prevention, and Rehabilitation, and the College Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association’s Strength and Conditioning Coach Certification Training Manual.  Dozens of students have conducted research under his mentorship and he truly believes that his greatest professional achievements are his former students who are pursuing their passions in medicine, nursing and other allied health fields, and teaching.

Dr. Feigenbaum also served as an Infantry Officer in the United States Army / National Guard and has deployed to both Afghanistan and the Middle East as well as conducted joint training with coalition forces in Saudi Arabia and Japan.  He is a graduate of the U.S. Army’s Airborne, Ranger, Pathfinder, and Maneuver Captains Career Courses and was awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) and Bronze Star for his post-9/11 wartime service.

Dr. Feigenbaum, a Florida native, and his wife Kathy were Furman classmates and married the year following graduation.  Kathy holds a Master’s degree from the University of Florida and is a Spanish Teacher at Langston Charter Middle School in Greenville.  Kathy and Matt have four children: Kasey, Sam, Colby, and Austyn.​

Name Title Description

HSC-101

Wellness Concepts

Wellness concepts which promote lifetime fitness and healthy lifestyle habits. Topics include: aerobic and muscular conditioning, nutrition, and medical aspects of fitness. Participation in activities to develop cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility.

HSC-211

Anatomy & Physiology II

Continuation of HSC-210. An integrative study of the structure and function of the following body systems: endocrine, lymphatic, digestive, urinary, reproductive, integumentary. The integration of structural and functional aspects of the human body will be facilitated by the use of anatomical models, interactive computer software, and data collection and analysis. Students may not receive credit for either BIO-118 or BIO-322 after successful completion.

HSC-341

Science of Aging

An in-depth analysis of aging, starting with changes occurring at the molecular and cellular level and analyzing their consequences at the organism level. The collective influence of these changes on organ function and their relationship to chronic diseases associated with aging, such as neurodegeneration, hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, etc., will also be discussed. Primary topics will include: theories of aging; experimental models used to study aging and longevity; the impact of oxidative stress in cells and consequences on organ function; functional changes in the sensory organs, nervous system, cardiorespiratory system, endocrine system, immune system, musculoskeletal system; genetics of aging.

HSC-342

Chronic Diseases

The pathologies of chronic disease and their underlying mechanisms at the molecular and cellular level and their consequences at the organ and organism level; emphasis on common chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders) including pathophysiology, etiology, signs and symptoms, and medical treatment.

HSC-343

Infectious Disease

Infectious diseases, their effects at the molecular and cellular level, and their consequences at the organ and organism level; emphasis on common infectious disease agents (e.g., bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, helminths, prions) including modes of transmission, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, and medical treatment. Students may not enroll in HSC-343 after successful completion of SCI-201 or BIO-301. Does not fulfill the microbiology requirement for allied health programs.

Textbook Chapters

  • Feigenbaum, M.S., P. McBride, and W.A. Webster. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Target Outcomes: Bridging the Gap (Chapter 5). In Pollock’s Textbook of Cardiovascular Disease and Rehabilitation. Eds. Durstine, J.L., G.E. Moore, M.J. LaMonte, & B.A. Franklin. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL; 2008.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., and K. Vincent. Strength Training (Chapter 16). In Pollock’s Textbook of Cardiovascular Disease and Rehabilitation. Eds. Durstine, J.L., G.E. Moore, M.J. LaMonte, & B.A. Franklin. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL; 2008.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S. “Rationale and Review of Current Guidelines (Chapter 2)” in Resistance Training for Health, Disease Prevention, and Rehabilitation. Eds. J.E. Graves and B. Franklin. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL; 2001.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S. “Exercise Prescription for Healthy Adults (Chapter 7)” in Resistance Training for Health, Disease Prevention, and Rehabilitation. Eds. J.E. Graves and B. Franklin. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL; 2001.
  • American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Position Stand: Writing Committee: W.J. Kraemer (Chair), K. Adams, E. Cafarelli, G.A. Dudley, C. Dooly, M.S. Feigenbaum, S.J. Fleck, B. Franklin, A.C. Fry, J.R. Hoffman, R.U. Newton, J. Potteiger, M.H. Stone, N.A. Ratamess, and T. Triplett‐McBide. American College of Sports Medicine (Position Stand). Progression models for resistance exercise in healthy adults: progression program for general fitness. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc, 34(2);364‐380, 2002.

Manuscripts

  • Watson, S., W. Webster, M. Feigenbaum, R. Jupp, M. Senn, C. Wracker, D. Blackhurst, M. Hendricks, J.L. Durstine. Assessing dietary fat intake in chronic disease rehabilitation programs. J. Cardiopulm. Rehabil. 22:161‐167, 2002. (Corresponding Author)
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., and R.K. Gentry (student co‐author). Prescription of resistance training for clinical populations. Am. J. Med. Sports 3:146‐158, 2001. 3. Haas, C.J., M.S. Feigenbaum, and B.A. Franklin. Prescription of resistance training for healthy populations. Sports Med., 31(14):953‐964, 2001.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., Welsch, M.A., Mitchell, M., Braith, R.W., and C.J. Pepine. Contracted plasma and blood volume in chronic heart failure. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 35(1):51‐55, 2000.
  • Braith, R., M.A. Welsch, Feigenbaum, M.S., Kluess, H.A., and C.J. Pepine. Neuroendocrine activation in heart failure is modified by endurance exercise training. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 34(4):1170‐1175, 1999.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., and M.L. Pollock. Prescription of resistance training for health and disease. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 31(1):38‐45, 1999.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., M.A. Welsch, W.F. Brechue, E.M. Handberg, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Plasma volume changes with an acute bout of high‐intensity exercise in men with chronic congestive heart failure secondary to coronary artery disease. Am. J. Cardiol. 81:509‐513, 1998.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., and M.L. Pollock. Strength training: rationale for current guidelines for adult fitness programs. Phys. Sportsmed. 25(2):44‐64, 1997.
  • Starkey, D.B., M.L. Pollock, Y. Ishida, M.A. Welsch, W.F. Brechue, J.E. Graves, and M.S. Feigenbaum. Effect of resistance training volume on strength and muscle fitness. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 28(10):1311‐1320, 1996.
  • Pollock, M.L., M.S. Feigenbaum, and W.F. Brechue. Exercise prescription for physical fitness. In Physical Activity, Fitness, and Health (J. Morrow, Editor). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics Publisher. QUEST, 47:320‐337, 1995.

Abstracts

  • O’Neill, A, V. Marsh, (student co‐authors) and M. Feigenbaum. Prevalence of biomarkers of vascular disease in young adults. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 44(S25S):2604, 2012.
  • Hartman, R. (student co‐author), M. Feigenbaum, J. Markowitz. Very low density lipoprotein in college students: A male problem? Pediatrics. Oct. 16, 2009: (Washington Convention Center).
  • Feigenbaum, M., W. Webster, S. Martin. Closing the treatment gap with cardiac rehabilitation in a heartcare partnership. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 37(5):S454, 2005.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., S.P. Martin, N. Robbertson, L. Rice, C.K. Mattingly, J. Johannes (student co‐author), E. Lominack, and W.A. Webster. Closing the treatment gap with South Carolina’s upstate heartcare partnership. Circulation 108(17):IV‐759, 2003.
  • Feigenbaum, M., W. Webster, A. Conroy, D. Blackhurst, and A. Phillip. Gender and race differences in coronary artery disease – angina warning system. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 33(5):S64, 2001.
  • Webster, W., A. Conroy, M.S. Feigenbaum, D. Blackhurst, J. Langel (student co‐author), K. Mitchell, J. Bruch. and A. Phillip. Angina presentation in type II diabetics and non‐diabetics with coronary artery disease. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 33(5):S64, 2001.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., M.A. Welsch, R.W. Braith, K. Vincent, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Exercise‐induced changes in alpha‐ and beta‐atrial natriuretic peptides in men with chronic congestive heart failure secondary to coronary artery disease. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 30(5):S‐16, 1998. 8. Feigenbaum, M.S., M.A. Welsch, R.W. Braith, M.K. Worley, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Exercise‐induced changes in plasma digitalis in chronic heart failure patients. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 29(5):S‐ 269, 1997.
  • Vincent, K.R., M.S. Feigenbaum, M.A. Welsch, R.W. Braith, M.K. Worley, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Acute exercise‐induced plasma and blood volume changes in elderly adults. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 29(5):S‐163, 1997.
  • Mitchell, M.J., M.S. Feigenbaum, M.A. Welsch, E.H. Thurmond, R.W. Braith, C.J. Pepine, and M.L. Pollock. Decreased plasma and blood volume in patients with chronic heart failure. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 29(5):S‐269, 1997.
  • Kluess, H., K. Worley, M. Welsch, E. Handberg, M. Feigenbaum, M. Pollock, and C. Pepine. Exercise training improves quality of life in patients with CHF. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 29(5):S‐168, 1997.
  • Feigenbaum, M.S., R.W. Braith, M.A. Welsch, E.H. Thurmond, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Neurohumoral hyperactivity during acute exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. Circulation 94(8):I‐191, 1996.
  • Braith, R.W., M.S. Feigenbaum, M.A. Welsch, M.K. Worley, M.L. Pollock, and R.M. Mills. Neuroendocrine hyperactivity in CHF is buffered by endurance exer. Circulation 94(8): I‐192, 1996.
  • Feigenbaum, M.F., Welsch, M.A., W.F. Brechue, P.R. Borum, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Plasma and red blood cell carnitine dynamics with exercise in chronic heart failure patients. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 28(5):S‐169, 1996.
  • Feigenbaum, M.F., M.A. Welsch, W.F. Brechue, E.M. Handberg, M.L. Pollock, and C.J. Pepine. Plasma volume changes with high‐intensity exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. Circulation 92(8):I‐398, 1995.
  • Welsch, M.A., M.S. Feigenbaum, W.F. Brechue, C.J. Pepine, and M.L. Pollock. Brachial artery responsiveness to ischemia and exercise. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 27(5):S‐31, 1995.

Dr. Feigenbaum and his students are interested in the mechanisms and associated risk factors that contribute to atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Through health screenings offered in the Wellness Concepts course over the past 20 years, blood samples have been collected from more than 4000 undergraduates. These samples have been screened for markers of vascular inflammation as well as the spectrum of common risk factors for chronic diseases. The data has been presented by Dr. Feigenbaum’s students at a variety of local, regional, and national meetings to include Furman Engaged, the Southeast Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine (SEACSM), the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), and the American Heart Association (AHA).

Education
Ph.D
University of Florida
M.A.​
Furman University
B.A.​
Furman University​

Connect with Admission

Furman is one of the nation's premier liberal arts and sciences universities. We offer our students The Furman Advantage—an over-arching approach to education that promises every student a four-year personalized pathway, a team of advisors and mentors, and the opportunity for an engaged learning experience that is tracked and integrated with the students' academic and professional goals.

Want more information about the admission process at Furman?

Contact us

Once you see our campus, making the right college decision will be so much easier.

Plan a visit

Undergraduate Evening Studies provides adults the opportunity to receive an education from one of the premier liberal arts universities in the nation.

Whether you are starting or continuing your education, or have been away from the classroom for a few months or several years, our program provides many services to assist you with accomplishing your educational and professional goals.

Apply now

Our graduate studies program is designed for the professional educator.

We know the challenges teachers and administrators face every day, and we are committed to helping you become a leader within your school system or district.

Apply now
  • Furman University